Striga asiatica

From Bugwoodwiki

Authors: Karan Rawlins, Hillery Reeves and Kaylee Tillery at the Center for Invasive Species & Ecosystem Health, University of Georgia

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Taxonomy
Kingdom:
Plantae
Phylum:
Magnoliophyta
Class:
Magnoliopsida
Order:
Scrophulariales
Family:
Scrophulariaceae
Genus:
Striga
Species:
S. asiatica
Scientific Name
Striga asiatica
(L.) Kuntze
Scientific Name Synonyms
Striga lutea
(L.) Kuntze
Common Names
witchweed, Asiatic witchweed

Overview

Appearance
Striga asiatica is a parasitic plant that can infest agricultural crops and has been found in North and South Carolina. Plants are normally 6-12 in. (15.2-30.5 cm) tall but have grown to 24 in. (61 cm).
Foliage
Leaves of Striga asiatica are linear and around 1 in. (2.5 cm) long.
Flowers
Striga asiatica flowers are small, less than 0.5 in. (1.3 cm) in diameter, occur in or on loose spikes, and can vary greatly in color from white to yellow, red, or purple.
Fruit
The flowers give way to swollen seed pods that contain thousands of microscopic seeds per pod.
Ecological Threat
Striga asiatica can parasitize important agricultural crops such as corn, sorghum, sugar cane and rice. The host plant's nutrients are depleted and energy is spent supporting the parasitic witchweed. Infestations reduce yields and contaminate crops. Witchweed is native to Asia and Africa and was first identified in the United States, in the Carolinas, in 1955. It is listed as a Federal Noxious Weed.

Resources

Images from Bugwood.org


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