SNIPM

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The Southern Nursery Integrated Pest Management (SNIPM) working group comprises a group of extension professionals from Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia representing Entomology, Horticulture, and Plant Pathology are collaborating on a multi-state nursery crops project that includes the development of a Crop Profile and a Pest Management Strategic Plan (CP/PMSP).


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For more information about our new book "IPM for Select Deciduous Trees in Southeastern US Nursery Production" please visit IPM book.

IPM Blog for Southeastern Nursery Growers

For news alerts and tips from Southeastern university research and extension specialists visit [1].


Contents

Mission Statement

The Southern Nursery IPM (SNIPM) Working Group is a collaboration among research and Extension professionals to provide timely integrated pest management (IPM) information to commercial horticulture growers, green industry professionals and extension educators; to identify and solve nursery-based IPM problems; develop technology to encourage use of and improve the efficacy of IPM practices and advocate the adoption and retention of IPM principles andpractices to commercial growers and policy makers.


Contributors

Name University Department State Contact Info.
Craig Adkins NC State University Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Horticulture
NC
Contact Craig
S. Kristine Braman University of Georgia Department of Entomology, Griffin
GA
Contact Kristine
Matthew Chappell University of Georgia Horticulture Department
GA
Contact Matthew
Juang-Horng (JC) Chong Clemson University School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Science

Pee Dee Research and Education Center

SC
Contact JC
Jeffrey F. Derr Virginia Tech Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, & Weed Science
VA
Contact Jeff
Winston C. Dunwell University of Kentucky Department of Horticulture
KY
Contact Win
Steven Frank NC State University Department of Entomology
NC
Contact Steven
Amy Fulcher University of Tennessee Department of Plant Sciences
TN
Contact Amy
Frank Hale The University of Tennessee Entomology and Plant Pathology Department
TN
Contact Frank
Bill Klingeman The University of Tennessee Department of Plant Sciences
TN
Contact Bill
Gary Knox The University of Florida Department of Environmental Horticulture

North Florida Research and Education Center

FL
Contact Gary
Anthony LeBude NC State University Horticultural Science,

Mountain Horticultural Crops Research & Extension

NC
Contact Anthony
Joe Neal NC State University Department of Horticultural Sciences
NC
Contact Joe
Nicole Ward University of Kentucky Department of Plant Pathology
KY
Contact Nicole
Sarah White Clemson University School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Science
SC
Contact Sarah
Jean Williams-Woodward University of Georgia Department of Plant Pathology
GA
Contact Jean
Alan Windham The University of Tennessee Entomology and Plant Pathology Department
TN
Contact Alan

Meetings

August 5, 2013 - SNIPM Working Group Meeting - SpringHill Suites Atlanta Airport Gateway

  2013 Southern Nursery Association Research Conference August 5-6, College Park, GA

September 24, 2012 - SNIPM Working Group Meeting

  Kanuga Conference Center, Hendersonville, NC

January 18, 2012 - SNIPM Working Group Meeting - Renaissance Mobile Riverview Plaza Hotel

  2012 SNA Research Conference January 18-19 with the Gulf State Horticultural Expo, Mobile, AL

July 26-27, 2011 - SNIPM Working Group Meeting

  Clemson Institute for Environmental Toxicology, Pendleton, SC

January 19, 2011 - Renaissance Mobile Riverview Plaza Hotel

  2011 Southern Nursery Association Research Conference Jan 19-20 with the Gulf States Horticultural Expo, Mobile AL

September 20, 2010 - SNIPM Working Group meeting

  Kanuga Conference Center, Hendersonville, NC   

January 20, 2010 - SNIPM Working Group Meeting - Renaissance Mobile Riverview Plaza Hotel

  2010 SNA Research Conference January 21-22 with the Gulf States Horticultural Expo, Mobile, AL

July 30-31, 2009 - Southern Region Nursery Crop Pest Management Meeting

  Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center, Mills River, NC

Rationale

Nursery crop production (both field and container) of ornamental trees and shrubs, is an important sector of US agriculture, especially in the southeastern United States. Ornamental plants are the second most valuable crop in the United States with a market value of $14.7 billion in 2002 (USDA, 2002). More recent state agricultural statistics indicate that the nursery and greenhouse industry is valued at $889,693,000 in North Carolina and at $316,000,000 for nursery crops (excluding greenhouse crops) in Georgia (Boatright and McKissick, 2008; NCDA, 2007b; USDA, 2002). Additionally, nursery crops ranked 1st and 5th among crops for NC and GA, respectively. Collectively, nursery production in GA, KY, NC, SC, and TN represent over one billion dollars in farm gate values annually. Nurseries in these southeastern states employ tens of thousands of workers.

Survey

A regional group of Extension specialists from TN, GA, NC, SC, & KY to survey current pest (insect, disease, & weed) management practices and current pest priorities of growers in southeastern, wholesale, ornamental nurseries. Our efforts have been funded by the Southern Region Integrated Pest Management Center (SRIPMC) and supported by each cooperating state’s nursery and landscape trade organization.

Results for each state will be combined and made available as an average. Combined results for grower initiated priorities for future pest management issues will be available to research, teaching, and Extension professionals, as well as the entire green industry. This insight into current and emerging pest priorities will allow research and Extension professionals to design their programs to investigate and resolve the most pressing pest issues in the green industry. Growers will be able to compare their pest management practices between states.

The survey was released to growers in GA, KY, NC, SC, & TN 8 July 2009 and was available to growers for online completion until 1 March 2010.

The survey took approximately 15 - 20 minutes to complete and all responses were anonymous and kept confidential.

Survey Respondents

As of 31 July 2009 there were 92 survey respondents respondents.

Sales Classification Respondent Number
Wholesale
100%
38
Wholesale
> 40%
60
Field Grown
100%
18
Field Grown
> 40%
23
Container Grown
100%
22
Container Grown
> 40%
47

Workshop

Conducted 30-31 July 2009 at the Mountain Horticulture Research and Extension Center (MHREC) in Mills River, NC. Nursery crop producers from five states (GA, KY, NC, SC, and TN) were identified and contacted about participating in an effort to identify pest priorities for nursery production. Growers ranked weed, disease, and insects pests prior to meeting as a focus group. Nursery crop growers and University personnel met over a 2 day period to discuss pest problems of trees and shrubs in container and field production. The group further prioritized insect, disease, and weed pests and identified regulatory,extension, and research needs.


Grower Comments on Diseases

Top diseases that affect them. What products used for control? Identify emerging diseases.

Grower #1
For fungal diseases and bacteria root rot, their key to controlling the diseases is water management. They also drench with Subdue. A spring fungicide application is made when foliage emerges. Sometimes dormant oil is used on conifers in the winter. Oils are used as an inexpensive insecticide in the spring. Spray for powdery mildew every 10-14 days. They use an airblast sprayer.

Grower # 2
Development of anything that can be used to refining pest timing such as a calendar. He suggested the states come together for a centralized web site to dump pest and timing information. Other ideas and suggestions include an overview of ways to reduce chemical use, including educating customers, better chemical information per pest/plant, and efficacy tables to help determine which is best for the grower to use and to facilitate effective rotation. Flathead apple tree borer and scale are harder to control with the chemicals available. It was suggested that there is a need to research systemic controls that are affordable, possibly as a pellet, for field production.

Grower #3
Disease control includes scouting, spraying and watching climate conditions. They use Subdue granular for red oak and drench.

Grower #5
Sanitation is heavily relied on to help control disease. They try to do preventive fungicide sprays.

Grower #6
Due to having residential neighbors, production practices take into consideration residential concerns, many of the products used can also be used in organic production, for example, Millstop for powdery mildew. Disease control practices emphasize cultural controls, spacing and cleanliness. In fall they apply a 3-4% hort oil. In late winter, when they are getting ready for spring, a dormant oil and fungicide are applied to everything. This is usually made on a cloudy day in February at 55 degrees, the perfect time to do this.

Grower Comments on Insects

Top insects that affect them. What products used for control? Identify emerging insects.

Grower # 3
Challenging pests include broad mites, aphids, pests in containers and root rot problem. Imidacloprid is used for insect control on shade tree (leafhoppers and borers). Dicsus costs $1 per tree, generic costs $0.28 per tree. Systemics take the management out of pest mgt. They use Precise on river birch.

Grower #4
Before spraying for pests they try to hold off. The only preventive sprays done are for borers. They use Imidacloprid for oak lecanium scale. For scouting, everybody looks. The employees know to tell if they see a pest.

Grower #5
They scout, monitor, and trap insects and also make calendar based-applications for pests known to occur.

Grower #7
Does some preventative spraying for pests that are always present.

Grower #9
Use Tristar, one appl., for maple tip borer. New pests include tree garbler, Lecanium scale. Fire ant baits are used twice a year and they drench everything that leaves the farm.

Grower Comments on Weeds

Top weeds that affect them. What products used for control? Identify emerging weeds.

Grower #1
Weed control is done using 3 applications at 9, 19, and 29 weeks. The use pendimethlin and simazine at very low rates. They use OH2 granular sometimes after potting with a seeder. The use Environmist and solo backpack for cleanup. Problem weeds are nutsedge and Round up-resistant marestail.

Grower #3
For weed control they spray as little as possible using an ATV with 25 gallon tank and clean up in summer with generic glyphosate in an environmist. They use Pendulum and simazine, experiment with Sureguard. In containers they rotate Broadstar and Snapshot and hand weed.

Grower #4
Weed control is done using pre emerge herbicides. Last year they used 9-10 drums of Roundup and now have changed to multiple products (Gallery, Barricade, Sureguard) and this year used less, only 2 drums.

Grower #5
For weed control they try to use lower rates at 4 times per year using Poast in the driveways, Surflan, glyphosate and some Sureguard for things such as dove weed. When they pot up liners someone treats the area with Snapshot pre-emergence herbicide at end of day.

Grower #6
With respect to weeds, they are clean operation because of the high visibility of the nursery. While weeding, they also scout for insects and diseases.

Grower #7
For weeds control they use a Clements mechanical weeder. They do a fall spray application of pre emergence herbicide. This is done late in fall when soil temperature is below 50. They spray Sureguard and have made it till June 15 without having to do a full rate spray of herbicide. The ultimate goal in their weed control program is to get to zero Roundup use.

Grower #8
Weed control begins and it is rotated with Factor and Gallery in injector system, generally on a twice yearly basis. Other than the problem weeds that have been discussed, weeds are controlled by hand weeding. Weeds are a problem in pot and pot operation which is located on a sandy hill side with landscape fabrics. They used to spray with Roundup, but due to trunk damage concerns have now started spraying Sureguard. They spray just the top of plots using a 50 gallon sprayer. They also use Sureguard in rows before taking up plastic.

Grower #9
They try to do as much as they can with as little, for example, using one sprayer by alternate row or middle application. For herbicide application they have 2 rigs to use in field and containers. Only 10% is container surface area so a wand is used to spray pre-emergence herbicide. Three spray technicians do most of the spraying. They use Roundup in the field and Poast on crabgrass in field production. Problem weeds include grass, broadleaf, and nutsedge. It is a problem to use roundup in field. Diquat and preemergence herbicides are used in containers and they do some hand weeding. In field, no pre emergence herbicide has been used in last 3 years due to rain.

Grower Comments on Environmental Issues

Water

The water situation for now is ok (in five states present) but some growers need to build ponds. Specific problems mentioned were those in south Florida where water is limited. In Georgia growers must be able to catch run off if they have a 12” metered well, that size limit will soon be lowered to a 6 inch metered well.

The North Carolina nursery industry is not considered agriculture and nurseries are being held to same standards as developers. Tennessee has abundant resources and the issues of drought have become real but no mandates for water conservation yet.

Growers express concerns over expectations that are not well reasoned and the need to consider net impact on job losses and economic impacts. They encouraged inter-agencies collaboration.

Growers are currently dealing more with local water districts and not on a state level. This is same for Kentucky – i.e., restrictions on watering lawn during drought, but no publicized effort to make changes on statewide effort for the industry.

In South Carolina, the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) is working with growers and have permitted ponds for run off due to drought because no city water is available. Sarah White is also working with treatment of water collected from nursery runoff in Georgia to help improve production practices.

Craig Adkins (NC State) is working with the Soil and Water Conservation EQUIP program with installation of riparian buffers and cover crops. They are also working with Carolina Land and Lakes as part of a water quality grant which includes water analysis in river basin areas that were highly populated (where agriculture land was developed).

Regulations

"What do you see in the future as to government regulations for irrigation water runoff." Dr. Toth replied that EPA is currently doing data call in and the next go round of product reviews should focus more on products’ effects on endangered species and ground water. From national level you should see more emphasis and possibly more state and local regulations on run off. In relation to endangered species, if they are in your county/areas you could be limited as to where you can apply a pesticide due to the presences of the endangered species. There should be available on web sites the locations where you could not apply chemicals.


Pest Management Strategic Plan

Pest Management Strategic Plans (PMSPs) are widely recognized as a conduit for communication from growers and other IPM practitioners to regulators and granting agencies. These documents give a realistic view of pest management issues and strategies used in the field and provide a forum to set meaningful research, regulatory, and educational priorities. Pest Management Strategic Plans (PMSPs) are developed by growers or other stakeholders to identify their pest management needs. Each plan has a state, region or national focus. The plans take a pest-by-pest approach to identifying the current management practices (chemical and non-chemical) and those under development. Plans also state priorities for research, regulatory activity, and education/training programs needed for transition to alternative pest management practices.

Benefits from completing a PMSP.

  • Regulators receive information on actual pest management practices and therefore will be less likely to use default assumptions in risk assessments.
  • Regulators are provided information on important uses for special concerns (e.g., resistance management, geographical concerns).
  • Stakeholders identify appropriate contact people to facilitate future communication.
  • Grant seekers acquire documentation of stakeholder priority needs to support funding requests.
  • Growers have available documentation to support Section 18 Emergency Exemption and Section 24(c) Special Local Needs requests.
  • Participants gain insight in emerging pest management issues toward prioritizing their research, education or other programs they sponsor.
  • Commodity representatives get a document that can be used to convey their needs to policy makers.
  • Support for IR-4 Food Use Workshop research prioritization is provided.
  • Registrants may use PMSPs to identify niche markets for development of new products.
  • Workshops provide a forum to discuss reduced-risk management options.
  • PMSPs foster multi-state and multi-regional collaboration resulting in less duplication of efforts and more judicious use of limited dollars.
  • PMSPs provide readily available information for interested members of the general public, students and others.

SNIPM CV

Grants

  • White, S.A., A. Fulcher, J.-H. Chong, A. LeBude, C. Adkins, K. Braman, M. Chappell, J. Derr, W. Dunwell, S. Frank, F. Hale, W. Klingeman, G. Knox, J. Neal, N. Ward, A. Windham, and J. Williams-Woodward. 2013. “IPM for Shrubs in Southeastern U.S. Nursery Production (Vol. I), a SNIPM Working Group Effort.” Southern Region IPM Center – IPM Enhancement Program. $29,983.
  • Fulcher, A.- PD, M. Chappell, A. Apon, K. Braman, J.-H. Chong, J. Cothren, B. Dean, J. Derr, W. Dunwell, S. Frank, F. Hale, W. Klingeman III, G. Knox, A. LeBude, J. Neal, M. Palma, M. Paret, R. Pargas, N. Ward, S. White, J. Williams-Woodward, and D. Woodard. “Mobile Technology, Sensor Networks, and Improved Predictive Models to Increase Sustainability in Nursery Crop Systems” Specialty Crops Research Initiative Coordinated Agriculture Project. Requested $9,212,797. Not awarded, rated High Priority.
  • Fulcher, A., J.-H. Chong, S. White, A. LeBude, W. Klingeman, M. Chappell, C. Adkins, K. Ivors, J. Neal, S. Frank, F. Hale, A. Windham, J. Williams-Woodward, K. Braman, and W. Dunwell. 2011. “Enhancing Nursery Crop Research and Extension with a Multi-State Working Group” IPM Enhancement Grant. Southern Region IPM Center. Requested and awarded $24,232.
  • Fulcher, A., A. LeBude, J. Williams-Woodward, S. White, S. Frank, F. Hale, M. Chappell, W. Dunwell, C. Adkins, K. Ivors, K. Braman, A. Windham, and J. Chong. 2009. “Multi-State Crop Profile and Pest Management Strategic Plan for Nursery Crops” IPM Enhancement Grant. Southern Region IPM Center. Requested and awarded $18,744.

Publications

Peer-Reviewed Publications

  • Fulcher, A., S.A. White, J.-H. (JC) Chong, J.C. Neal, J.L. Williams-Woodward, C.R. Adkins, S.K. Braman, M.R. Chappell, J.F. Derr, W.C. Dunwell, S.D. Frank, S.A. Gill, F.A. Hale, W.E. Klingeman, A.V. LeBude, K. Rane, and A.S. Windham. 2013. "Testing, promoting, and launching a mobile application as an extension tool: A case study with IPMPro." HortTechnology. 23(4):407-410.
  • Fulcher, A., J.-H. (JC) Chong, S.A. White, J.C. Neal, J.L. Williams-Woodward, C.R. Adkins, S.K. Braman, M.R. Chappell, J.F. Derr, W.C. Dunwell, S.D. Frank, S.A. Gill, F.A. Hale, W.E. Klingeman, A.V. LeBude, K. Rane, and A.S. Windham. 2013. "Developing a mobile application as an extension education tool: A case study using IPMPro." HortTechnology. 23(4):402-406.
  • Frank, S.D., W.E. Klingeman, S.A. White, and A.F. Fulcher. 2013. “Biology, injury, and management of maple tree pests in nurseries and urban landscapes.” Journal of Integrated Pest Management. 4(1):1-14.
  • Knox, G.W., W.E. Klingeman, M.L. Paret, and A.F. Fulcher. Management of pests, plant diseases and abiotic disorders of Magnolia species in the Southeastern U.S.: A review. Journal of Environmental Horticulture, 30(4):223-234.
  • Fulcher, A., W.E. Klingeman, J.-H. Chong, A. LeBude, G.R. Armel, M. Chappell, S. Frank, F. Hale, J. Neal, S.A. White, J. Williams-Woodward, K. Ivors, C. Adkins, A. Senesac, and A. Windham. 2012. Stakeholder vision of future direction and strategies for southeastern U.S. nursery pest research and Extension programming. Journal of Integrated Pest Management, 3(2):D1-D8(8). [2]
  • Chappell, M.R., S.K. Braman, J. Williams-Woodward, and G.W. Knox. 2012. Optimizing Plant Health and Pest Management of Lagerstroemia spp. in Commercial Production and Landscape Situations in the Southeastern U.S.: A Review. J. Environ. Hort. 30(3):161-172.
  • LeBude, A., S.A. White, A. Fulcher, S. Frank, J-H. Chong, M. Chappell, W. Klingeman III, A. Windham, K. Braman, F. Hale, W. Dunwell, J. Williams-Woodward, K. Ivors, C. Adkins, and J. Neal. 2011. Assessing the Integrated Pest Management Practices of Southeastern U.S. Ornamental Nursery Operations. Pest Management Science. 68:1278–1288. DOI 10.1002/ps.3295.

Books

  • Adkins, C.R., S.K. Braman, M.R. Chappell, J.-H. Chong, J.F. Derr, W.C. Dunwell, S.D. Frank, A.F. Fulcher, F.A. Hale, W.E. Klingeman, G.W. Knox, A.V. LeBude, M.L. Paret, J.C. Neal, J.R. Sidebottom, N.A. Ward, S.A. White, J. L. Williams-Woodward, and A.S. Windham. 2012. IPM for Select Deciduous Trees in Southeastern US Nursery Production. Fulcher, AF, SA White, Eds. Knoxville, TN: Southern Nursery IPM Working Group. Print ISBN: 978-0-9854998-1-5
  • Available electronically via iTunes: [3]

Abstracts

  • White, S.A., A.F. Fulcher, A.V. LeBude, S. Frank, F. Hale, W.E. Klingeman, C. Adkins, K. Braman, M.R. Chappell, J.-H. (JC) Chong, J.F. Derr, W.C. Dunwell, G.W. Knox, M.L. Paret, J.C. Neal, N.A. Ward, J. Williams-Woodward and A.S. Windham. 2013. Ebooks: A new platform for extension outreach. HortScience 48(9):S281.
  • Fulcher, A., J.-H. (JC ) Chong, J. Neal, S.A. White, J. Williams-Woodward, C. Adkins, K. Braman, M. Chappell, J. Derr, W. Dunwell, S. Frank, S. Gill, F. Hale, W. Klingeman, A. LeBude, K. Rane and A. Windham. 2012. Educators’ Guide to Developing an App. HortScience, 47(7):S111-112.
  • Fulcher, A., J.-H. (JC) Chong, J. Derr, S.A. White, J. Williams-Woodward, C. Adkins, K. Braman, M. Chappell, , W. Dunwell, S. Frank, S. Gill, F. Hale, W. Klingeman III, A. LeBude, J. Neal, K. Rane and A. Windham. 2012. Educators’ Guide to Testing, Launching and Promoting an App. HortScience, 47(7):S112.
  • LeBude, A., S. White, J.-H. (JC) Chong, M. Chappell, K. Braman, A. Windham, F. Hale, W. Klingeman, J. Neal, W. Dunwell, J. Williams-Woodward, and A. Fulcher. 2011. Assessing the Integrated Pest Management Practices of Southeastern U.S. Nursery Operations. HortScience. 46(9):S167-S168
  • Fulcher, A., C. Adkins, K. Braman, M.R. Chappell, J-H. Chong, W. Dunwell, S. Frank, F. Hale, K. Ivors, W. Klingeman III, A.V. LeBude, J. Neal, S. White, Jean Williams-Woodward, and A. Windham. 2011. Multiplier Effect of Collaborative Nursery Crops Programming On Outputs and Outcomes. HortScience. 46(9):S377-S378.

Research Conference Proceedings

  • Fulcher, A., C. Adkins, G. Armel, M. Chappell, J. Chong, S. Frank, F. Hale, K. Ivors, W. Klingeman III, A. LeBude, J. Neal, A. Senesac, S. White, J. Williams-Woodward, A. Windham. 2011. Gleanings from a Five-State Pest Management Strategic Plan and Crop Profile. Proc. Southern Nursery Association Research Conference. 56:75-84.

Regional Publications

  • Fulcher, A., C. Adkins, G. Armel, M. Chappell, J. Chong, S. Frank, F. Hale, K. Ivors, W. Klingeman III, A. LeBude, J. Neal, A. Senesac, S. White, J. Williams-Woodward, A. Windham. 2010. Gleanings from a Five-State Pest Management Strategic Plan and Crop Profile. Nursery and Landscape Program Research Report, PR 621, University of Kentucky pp 9-12.

[4]

  • Adkins, C., G. Armel, M. Chappell, J.C. Chong, S. Frank, A. Fulcher, F. Hale, K. Ivors, W. Klingeman III, A. LeBude, J. Neal, A. Senesac, S. White, A. Windham. 2010. Pest Management Strategic Plan for Container and Field-Produced Nursery Crops in GA, KY, NC, SC, TN. A. Fulcher, ed. Southern Region IPM Center.
  • Adkins, C., G. Armel, M. Chappell, J.C. Chong, S. Frank, A. Fulcher, F. Hale, K. Ivors, W. Klingeman, A. LeBude, J. Neal, A. Senesac, S. White, J. Williams-Woodward, and A. Windham. 2010. Crop Profile for Container and Field-Produced Nursery Crops in Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. A. Fulcher (ed.). Southern Region IPM Center.

University Research Reports & Extension Publications

  • Knox, G.W., M. Chappell and R.H. Stamps. 2012. Alternatives to synthetic herbicides for weed management in container nurseries, ENH1203. Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, Gainesville, FL. 6 pp.
  • Chappell, M., J. Williams-Woodward, A. LeBude, A. Fulcher, S. White, S. Frank, and J. Neal. 2011. Top 10 nursery production integrated pest management practices in the Southeast. University of Georgia C 1008. [5]
  • Fulcher, A., C. Adkins, G. Armel, M. Chappell, J. Chong, S. Frank, F. Hale, K. Ivors, W. Klingeman III, A. LeBude, J. Neal, A. Senesac, S. White, J. Williams-Woodward, A. Windham. 2010. Gleanings from a Five-State Pest Management Strategic Plan and Crop Profile. Nursery and Landscape Program Research Report, University of Kentucky pp 9-12. [6]
  • Chappell, M., J. Williams-Woodward, A. LeBude, A. Fulcher, S. White, S. Frank, and J. Neal. 2011. Top 10 nursery production integrated pest management practices in the Southeast. University of Georgia C 1008. [7]

Popular Press

  • Fulcher, A., A. LeBude, S. White, J-H Chong, C. Adkins, K. Braman, M. Chappell, J. Derr, W. Dunwell, S. Frank, S. Gill, F. Hale, W. Klingeman, G. Knox, J. Neal, M. Paret, K. Rane, N. Ward, J. Williams-Woodward, and A. Windham. 2013. IPM in action. Nursery Management 29(12):30-33. [8]
  • Knox, G., M. Paret, A. Fulcher, and W. Klingeman. 2013. Diseases and disorders of Magnolia species in the southeastern United States. Magnolia. 93:29-41.
  • Knox, G., W. Klingeman, A. Fulcher, and M. Paret. 2013. Insect and nematode pests of Magnolia species in the southeastern United States. Magnolia. 94:20-38.
  • White, S.A., A.F. Fulcher, A.V. LeBude, W.E. Klingeman III, M.R. Chappell, S. Frank. 2011. Top 10 Applied and Potential IPM Practices for Nurseries in the Southeastern US. Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association Newsletter. 81(4): 43-46.
  • Fulcher, A.F., W.E. Klingeman, A.V. LeBude, S.A. White, M.M. Chappell, S. Frank, and J. Neal. 2011. IPM Strategies: What Are Southeastern Growers Doing to Stop Pests in Their Tracks? Tennessee Green Times. 12(8): 10-14.
  • Fulcher, A.F., W.E. Klingeman, A.V. LeBude, S.A. White, M.M. Chappell, S. Frank, J. Neal. 2011. “IPM Strategies.” Nursery Management. 27(5): 30-32.
  • White, S.A, A.F. Fulcher, A.V. LeBude, M. Chappell, and S. Frank 2011. “Top 10 Applied and Potential IPM Practices for Nurseries in the Southeast.” SC Nurseryman. Jan/Feb: 30-32.
  • LeBude, A.V., A.F. Fulcher, S. White, M. Chappell, S. Frank, and J. Neal. 2011. Top 10 practices in the southeast that are – or should be – used in nurseries. Nursery Notes. 45(1): 31, 33-35.
  • Hallberg, R, A. Fulcher, J. Neal, K. Ivors, A. LeBude, and S. Frank. 2010. Integrated pest management: Growers and researchers meet to develop a pest management strategic plan. NMPro. 26(1): 44-45.

Presentations

Invited Presentations

  • Fulcher, A, J.-H. (JC ) Chong, S. White, J. Williams-Woodward, C. Adkins, K. Braman, M. Chappell, J. Derr, W. Dunwell, S. Frank, S. Gill, F. Hale, W. Klingeman, A. LeBude, J. Neal, K. Rane and A. Windham. From Tractor Seat to Techie: Why Mobile Applications Are An Investment in Extension’s Future. Extension/Industry Breakfast, American Society for Horticultural Science Annual Conference, July 23, 2013, Palm Desert, CA.
  • Fulcher, A., W. Klingeman, A. LeBude, and S.A. White. Straight Talk on IPMPro. Southern Nursery Association Trade Show. August 6, 2013, Atlanta, GA.
  • Chong, J.-H., A. Fulcher, S. White, J. Williams-Woodward, C. Adkins, K. Braman, M. Chappell, J. Derr, W. Dunwell, S. Frank, S. Gill, F. Hale, W. Klingeman, A. LeBude, J. Neal, K. Rane, and A. Windham. 2012. IPMPro app Android and iPhone, iPad Touch, and iPad-compatible green industry app on major pests and plant care practices. National Workshop on Pests and Diseases of Ornamental Plant. September 27, 2012, Kanuga, NC.
  • LeBude, A., A. Fulcher, S. White, S. Frank, J.-H. Chong, M. Chappell, W. Dunwell, A. Windham, F. Hale, W. Klingeman III, K. Braman, K. Ivors, J. Williams-Woodward, J. Neal, and C. Adkins. 2011. Integrated pest management: A SNIPM survey. Invited presentation to the Southern Region IPM Advisory Council meeting. June 20, 2011, Raleigh, NC.

Other Presentations

  • Fulcher, A., J.-H. (JC ) Chong, J. Neal, S. White, J. Williams-Woodward, C. Adkins, K. Braman, M. Chappell, J. Derr, W. Dunwell, S. Frank, S. Gill, F. Hale, W. Klingeman, A. LeBude, K. Rane and A. Windham. 2012. Educators’ Guide to Developing an App. American Society for Horticultural Science annual conference, August 3, 2012, Miami, FL.
  • Fulcher, A., J.-H. (JC) Chong, J. Derr, S. White, J. Williams-Woodward, C. Adkins, K. Braman, M. Chappell, , W. Dunwell, S. Frank, S. Gill, F. Hale, W. Klingeman III, A. LeBude, J. Neal, K. Rane and A. Windham. 2012. Educators’ Guide to Testing, Launching and Promoting an App. American Society for Horticultural Science annual conference, August 3, 2012, Miami, FL.
  • Fulcher, A., C. Adkins, K. Braman, M.R. Chappell, J-H. Chong, W. Dunwell, S. Frank, F. Hale, K. Ivors, W. Klingeman III, A.V. LeBude, J. Neal, S. White, Jean Williams-Woodward, and A. Windham. 2011. Multiplier Effect of Collaborative Nursery Crops Programming On Outputs and Outcomes. American Society for Horticultural Science annual conference, September 27, 2011, Waikoloa, HI.
  • LeBude, A., S. White, S. Frank, J.-H. Chong, M. Chappell, K. Braman, A. Windham, K. Ivors, F. Hale, W. Klingeman, J. Neal, W. Dunwell, J. Williams-Woodward, C. Adkins, and A. Fulcher (presenter). Assessing Integrated Pest Management Practices of Southeast US Nursery Operations. American Society for Horticultural Science annual conference, September 27, 2011, Waikoloa, HI.
  • Fulcher, A., Craig Adkins, Greg Armel, Matthew Chappell, J.-H. Chong, Steven Frank, Frank Hale, Kelly Ivors, William Klingeman III, Anthony LeBude, Joe Neal, Andrew Senesac, Sarah White, Jean Williams-Woodward, and Alan Windham. 2011. Gleanings from a Five State Pest Management Strategic Plan and Crop Profile. Southern Nursery Association Research Conference, January 19-20, 2011, Mobile, AL.
  • LeBude, A., S. Frank, J. Neal, A. Fulcher, W. Dunwell, S. White, J.H. Chong, S. Jeffers, M. Chappell, K. Braman, J. Williams-Woodward, A. Windham, and F. Hale. IPM Practices of Nursery Growers: SNIPM's Southeast Survey. 17th Annual Ornamental Workshop on Diseases and Insects, September 25, 2011, Hendersonville, NC.

Multimedia

Mobile Device Applications

  • Fulcher, A., J.-H. (JC ) Chong, S.A. White, J. Williams-Woodward, C. Adkins, K. Braman, M. Chappell, J. Derr, W. Dunwell, S. Frank, S. Gill, F. Hale, W. Klingeman, A. LeBude, J. Neal, K. Rane and A. Windham. 2012. IPMPro App. Android and iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad-compatible Green Industry app on major pests and plant care practices. [9]
  • Fulcher, A., J.-H. (JC ) Chong, S.A. White, J. Williams-Woodward, C. Adkins, K. Braman, M. Chappell, J. Derr, W. Dunwell, S. Frank, S. Gill, F. Hale, W. Klingeman, A. LeBude, J. Neal, K. Rane and A. Windham. 2012. IPMLite App. Android and iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad-compatible app on major pests and plant care practices for gardeners. [10]

Videos

Knox, G.W., M. Chappell, L. Landrum and A. Bolques. 2013. Moving Nursery Producers Toward Sustainability: Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in the nursery (video; 7:39). [11]

Website

White, S.A. SNIPM website [12]

SNIPM Committees

SNIPM Chairs

2013-2014
Chair: Amy Fulcher
Vice-Chair: JC Chong
Secretary: Matthew Chappell
Webmaster: Sarah White
Blog Coordinator: Matthew Chappell

2012-2013
Chair: Amy Fulcher
Webmaster: Sarah White
Blog Coordinator: Matthew Chappell

2011-2012
Chair: Amy Fulcher
Webmaster: Sarah White
Blog Coordinator: Matthew Chappell

2009-2011
Chair: Amy Fulcher
Survey Chair: Anthony LeBude
Entomology Chair: Steven Frank
Plant Pathology Chair: Kelly Ivors
Weed Science Chair: Joe Neal
Webmaster: Sarah White

Grant Committee

2013
Chair - Anthony LeBude
Sarah White
Amy Fulcher
Bill Klingeman

2012
Chair - Sarah White
JC Chong
Amy Fulcher
Anthony LeBude

2011
Kris Braman
Kelly Ivors
JC Chong
Amy Fulcher
Bill Klingeman
Anthony LeBude

2009
Anthony LeBude
Win Dunwell
Jean Williams-Woodward
Joe Neal
Frank Hale
Steve Frank
Amy Fulcher
Patty Lucas

Smart-Phone App Committee

Coordinator: Amy Fulcher
Plant Pathology Lead: Jean Williams-Woodward
Entomology Lead: JC Chong
Weed Science Leads: Joe Neal and Jeff Derr
Horticulturist Lead: Sarah White

E-book Committee

IPM for Shrubs (2013-2014)
Co-chairs: Sarah White and Bill Klingeman
Amy Fulcher
Anthony LeBude
Win Dunwell


IPM for Trees (2012-2013)
Co-chairs: Amy Fulcher and Sarah White
Steve Frank
Frank Hale
Bill Klingeman

Planning Committee

Anthony LeBude
Matthew Chappell
Joe Neal
Alan Windham

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